Is Aspergers an evolutionary evolved characteristic?

Jon

Administrator
Staff member
#1
Giraffes evolved to feed on the leaves that others couldn't reach. This can be referred to as The Red Queen Effect. An evolutionary adaption comes to the fore, enabling a competitive advantage for those newly evolved traits.

Could Aspergers be an example of this? Does anyone here have Aspergers and how does it manifest itself in your thinking and behaviour?

[Edit: Bee, is my title repeating words? I could say evolved characteristic but it doesn't stress evolution??]
 
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Jon

Administrator
Staff member
#3
I suspect that "evolved" would suffice. My angle is that sometimes, those with Aspergers can be exceptionally logical, gifted in fact, in some areas. Say perhaps maths, although that is a guess. While it is considered a disability, perhaps in evolutionary terms it is in fact an adaption to take advantage of differences.
 

Bee

Founding Member
#5
On a more important note, it's not always true that someone with Asperger's (and other non-neuro typical disorders) is gifted in one or more areas. For some, it's a disability - and for others the advantage they may have with say, pattern recognition or coding, doesn't make up for what they may lose in social situations.

I'm only pointing this out, because too many people think of the Rain-Man effect and assume that everyone who is non-neuro-typical must be a genius at something.
 

The_Doc_Man

Founding Member
#6
Some of us have natural talents; others of us merely develop what we had normally.

For instance, I used to be a crastinator. Then in my later life I lost my amateur status.
 

Jon

Administrator
Staff member
#7
Bee, I understand your point which is why I said, "sometimes." However, the perspective of if something is a disability or not may depend on the environment. Let's go back to the giraffe. With strong competition for the veg at lower levels, those high-up leaves may be plentiful. Everything has a flip side. So, perhaps we are arguing the same point. Being exceptional at math may mean you see everything as a mathematical construct. This would wither your social skills, perhaps, where you are operating on a different plain to everyone else.

Example:

Person A: "What a lovely plant!"

Person B: "Yes indeed, the fractals are turning me on!"

(No guesses for which person has Aspergers!)
 
#9
I remember watching twizzle on the television when I was a kid. I remember an episode when there was a really tall character, and a really short character. The story was around the idea that the tall guy could reach stuff at high places and the little guy was jealous, but then the little guy could get in places where the tall guy couldn't. It was like a message for children about evolution. Mind you, the only main thing I remember about twizzle is twizzle swallowed a whistle and spoke with a whistling noise!
 
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